Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense): Images

Date Location Notes Images
July 20, 2009 Southeastern, New Hampshire Much bigger leaves than the typical, tiny 3-leaf clover. Has a white or pale arrow head-like symbol on the leaves. My guidebook calls this symbol a “chevron”. It is found in fields or roadsides. Notice the big purple flower.

I infused a handful rinsed and fresh red clover flowers in a pint of very hot water for about 10 minutes. Then added honey to taste to make a healing tea.
Date Location Notes Images
June 13, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Found a large amount of Oxeye Daisy blossoms and Red Clover blossoms (1-1/2 gallons by volume of each) for wine. (See June 13, 2010 foraging experiences entry.). There were two areas with large amounts of each of these plants. In fact, there is plenty more for salads (Oxeye Daisy leaves) and for tinctures and tea (Red Clover blossomes).
Date Location Notes Images
April 11, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire Young Red Clover.
Date Location Notes Images
July 7, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire
Date Location Notes Images
June 2, 2014 Southern, Connecticut
Date Location Notes Images
June 7, 2014 Central, Connecticut