Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Spotted Ladysthumb (Polygonum persicaria): Images

Date Location Notes Images
May 27, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Spotted Ladysthumb is easy to identify. The 3-6 inch lanceolate, untoothed leaves have a dark splotch in the center of each leaf. The leaf margins are wavy and drooping. It is a member of the Buckwheat family.
Date Location Notes Images
September 14, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Spotted Ladysthumb in flower. As you can see, the spot on the leaf is somewhat faded, but can be made out when enlarging the image. It looks a bit like a shadow now. At first glance, this might be considered Curlytop Knotweed (Polygonum lapathifolium), but the ladysthumbs (Spotted Ladysthumb (Polygonum persicaria) and Oriental Ladysthumb (Polygonum cespitosum)) both have spots on the leaves. In addition, they both have fringe hairs at the end of the ocrea (sheath formed by the node of a stem and the two stipules). Curlytop Knotweed does not have a hairy fringe. But in the first image you can see a hairy fringe that is less than the length of the sheath itself. Oriental Ladysthumb has fringe hairs as long or longer than the sheath and also has cilia (hairs) at the base of most of the tiny pink flowers that are longer than the flowers. Details can be found on Missouri Plants web site for Oriental Ladysthumb. Due to the shorter fringe hairs and lack of cilia at the base of the flowers, these pictures are of Spotted Ladysthumb.
Date Location Notes Images
August 18, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire