Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Solomon's Seal (Smooth Solomon's Seal) (Polygonatum biflorum): Images

Date Location Notes Images
May 10, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire In the same area as I found this Solomon's Seal, there were countless Feathery False Solomon's Seal plants (Maianthemum racemosum). You can see that one of the main differences between the plants is that the flowers of the true Solomon's Seal grow all along the bottom of the stem and hang down. The flowers of the Feathery False Solomon's Seal grow at the apex/end of the stem. Also the root of the Solomon's Seal has more pronounced nodes -- each node signifying one year of plant growth.
Date Location Notes Images
July 23, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Took numerous pictures of a couple of Solomon‘s Seal plants. First set was of a younger plant and then second set was of a mature plant. I will use these pictures to compare with pictures of Sessile Bellwort (Wild Oats) (Uvularia sessilifolia) so I can see the differences when there are no flowers, fruit or double branches (for the Sessile Bellwort).
Date Location Notes Images
July 24, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Took some additional Solomon‘s Seal pictures. The plants were growing in the same location as some Sessile Bellwort (Wild Oats). Notice that these leaves are not quite as wide as yesterday‘s Solomon‘s Seal leaves.
Date Location Notes Images
April 30, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire
Date Location Notes Images
May 18, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire