Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Feathery False Solomon's Seal (Treacleberry, Solomon's plume, False Spikenard) (Maianthemum racemosum): Images

Date Location Notes Images
May 10, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire The leaves are similar in shape to the true Solomon's Seal, but the most obvious difference is that the tiny flowers are all bunched and hanging down from the apex/front of the plant. True Solomon's Seal flowers hang down are various points below the stem. The leaves are a pointy oval shaped and alternate along the stem. Like the Solomon's Seal, the rhizome has swollen nodes, each node indicating one year's worth of growth. The rhizome of Feathery False Solomon's Seal has an orange tinge, while the rhizome for Solomon's Seal is white. It can be found in moist woods, clearings and banks. You may notice that Feather False Solomon's Seal (Maianthemum racemosum) has the same genus as Canada Mayflower (Maianthemum canadense) and a similar style of leaf.
Date Location Notes Images
September 14, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire False Solomon‘s Seal ripe fruit. Edible, but the inedible, hard seed is 90% of the fruit.
Date Location Notes Images
August 28, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire
Date Location Notes Images
May 18, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire