Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Wild Strawberry (Virginia Strawberry) (Fragaria virginiana): Images

Date Location Notes Images
May 15, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Wild Strawberry is a low-to-the-ground plant with three leaflets on a leaf stalk (petiole). Each leaflet is sharply-toothed on the upper 50% of the leftlet and without teeth on the lower portion of the leaflet. One of the distinguishing features of Wild Strawberry is that the center tooth on each leaflet is noticably smaller than the other teeth. Wild Strawberry has a 5-petal white flower with a yellow center consisting of approximately 25 stamen. The plant produces long runners (up to 2 feet long) which can re-root and create new strawberry plants. Wild Strawberry blooms in the late Spring and early Summer. The is one of the two original strawberry plants that were hybridized to make the typical garden strawberry. (The other strawberry plant was from Chile.)
Date Location Notes Images
May 7, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire
Date Location Notes Images
April 26, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire