Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

American Trout-Lily (Dogtooth Violet) (Erythronium americanum): Images

Date Location Notes Images
April 28, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire
Date Location Notes Images
April 29, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire I went back today to collect American Trout-Lily for food. Saw three patches of it growing. The patch in the location more exposed to the sun had flowers already while the other two patches had no flowers.

I steam the Trout-Lily leaves and bulbs for 8 minutes. The leaves might have been overcooked a bit and had the consistency of cooked spinach. Good taste, but the leaves didn't break down much upon chewing (unlike spinach).
Date Location Notes Images
April 30, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire I found Trout Lily in a new location along a forest trail that run adjacent to a river.
Date Location Notes Images
May 10, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire I tried raw Trout Lily. It is excellent. Somewhat of a cucumber-like taste. I like it much better than cooked Trout Lily. Found a huge supply in the woods across the street from my discovery of Trout Lily in April.
Date Location Notes Images
April 8, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire Luckily, I looked through the calendar section of Arthur Haines' excellent book, Ancestral Plants (Volume 1) to see what would be available to collect in early April. American Trout-Lily bulbs were one of several available to collect and from last year I knew exactly where to find them!

They are much harder to collect than expected. Not only are the bulbs deep in the ground (for such a small plant), but tree roots get in the way of digging. It take patience -- much more than I had today. I ate some raw and they were a little bland, but not bad. I steamed the leaves and bulbs in a metal steamer. Steamed American Trout-Lily leaves are very good. Last year, when I cooked the leaves in water, they got too soggy and weren't very good, but steaming is the way to go. The bulbs were just as bland cooked as raw.
Date Location Notes Images
April 24, 2013 Southeastern, New Hampshire Trout-Lily salad.