Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea) (Also known as: Swida sericea): Images

Date Location Notes Images
August 26, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire The other white fruited dogwood that looks similar is Gray Dogwood (Northern Swamp Dogwood) (Cornus racemosa). It has 3-4 veins (rarely 5 veins) on each side of the midrib while Red Osier Dogwood has 5-7 veins. Gray Dogwood has tan twigs and Red Osier Dogwood has bright red twigs. Gray Dogwood leaves are cuneate (tapering to a point) at the base and Red Osier Dogwood leaves are broadly-rounded or sometimes acute at the base.
Date Location Notes Images
May 15, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire
  • Leaves opposite.
  • Fruit is white or blue (last Fall it was white on this plant).
  • Pith color is white.
  • Leaves have 5 or more pairs of veins. If it had 3-4 pairs of veins, it would be Cornus racemosa.
  • Branchlets red to red-purple. Fruit white (rarely light blue).
Date Location Notes Images
July 4, 2012 Southeastern, New Hampshire
  • Leaves opposite.
  • Fruit is white or blue (last Fall it was white on this plant).
  • Pith color is white.
  • Leaves have 5 or more pairs of veins. If it had 3-4 pairs of veins, it would be Cornus racemosa.
  • Fruit is white (rarely blue). Seeds brown (not light brown) with 7-9 stripes (see closeup image), buds densely pubescent with red-brown and some white hairs (see closeup image).