Transformational Gardening

Disclaimer: Foraging can be fun, rewarding and provide health benefits. As a novice forager, I will be sharing my foraging experiences. However, in order to be safe, always consult with local foraging experts and guidebooks before beginning foraging. Children should learn to forage safely by being guided by experienced adults. Never ingest anything unless you are certain of the identification and safety of the plant. Some plant species are inedible and some are poisonous.

Celandine (Chelidonium majus): Images

Date Location Notes Images
May 10, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Deep yellow colored 4-petal, radially symmetrical flower. One petal missing in image. The leaves are over 4 inches long, alternate up the stem and are divided into heavily-lobed segments.
Date Location Notes Images
May 13, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire A big patch of Celandine. These leaves are also heavily-lobed, but not lobed quite as much as the plant pictured above.
Date Location Notes Images
June 7, 2010 Southeastern, New Hampshire Notice the vertical seed pods that are now growing on the Celandine plant.
Date Location Notes Images
April 10, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire Celandine is a perennial and is one of the first plants to come up in the Spring. Alternate leaves with 5 to 7 lobes. It can be hard to see from the pictures, but Celandine has a fusiform root, meaning a root that is wider in the middle and tapers at the top and bottom. The thinner bottom piece is broken off in the picture.
Date Location Notes Images
April 15, 2011 Southeastern, New Hampshire More Spring Celandine pictures. Notice that leaf blade and leaf stems are hairy. Notice the orange sap that is developing at the bottom of the plant (above the root).